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Action Alert - Family Leave

ACTION ALERT – Paid Medical Leave

Federally Employed Women (FEW) is asking our many members to contact their legislators and urge them to co-sponsor and support the bill The Family Act, sponsored by Senator Kirsten Gilibrand (D-NY), which creates a self-sustaining family insurance program for all workers – young and elderly, single and married, and women and men, regardless of the size of their employer. Modeled after successful state programs, and costing only as much as a cup of coffee per week, the fund would provide up to 66 percent wage-replacement for 12 weeks in the event of a serious personal or family medical emergency.

PAID FAMILY LEAVE PROVIDES ECONOMIC SECURITY FOR WORKING AMERICAN FAMILIES

FEW Supports S. 337 The Family Act, as introduced by
Senator Kirsten Gilibrand (D-NY)
And H.R. 947 The Family Act, as introduced by
Representative Rosa DeLauro (D-CT)

The U. S. economy loses $21 billion a year because of
minimal access to paid family leave

The American public overwhelmingly supports policies that guarantee workers paid leave if they have a child, get sick or need to care for a family member. Yet the United States is the only developed nation that lacks a paid family leave mandate.

Senator Kirsten Gillibrand is hoping to change that. Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand York is calling on the Trump administration to support a nation-wide, gender-neutral paid family leave program. She stated that Ivanka Trump's plan has not made it into policy from the White House and does not go far enough. Gillibrand, a Democrat from New York who has served since 2009, has introduced a universal paid family leave law bill every year for the last five years. Her bill promises up to 12 weeks of paid time off for any worker -- female or male -- who has a new child, including newly fostered or adopted children. It also applies to people who have a "serious" medical condition or a family member suffering with one.

Summary:

Here's how Senator Gillibrand's plan would work: While the workers are off the job, they would be guaranteed at least 66% of their regular earnings or up to $4,000 per month. The measure would cover everyone with a job -- from part-time fast food workers to cashiers at mom-and-pop shops. Senator Gillibrand proposes paying for the plan through tax contributions from employers and workers. Both would be required to pay what equals to two cents per $10 earned. That tax money would go into a government-managed fund. Then, when a worker is on family leave, he or she will draw paychecks from it. About 14 percent of American workers currently have access to paid family leave of any kind, according to the National Compensation Survey.

Administration Summary:

In its 2018 budget, the Trump administration included a national paid-leave plan for parents after the birth or adoption of a child. Proposed are six weeks of paid leave for mothers and fathers at an estimated annual cost of $25 billion, funded by restructuring the federal unemployment insurance system. This position is documented and supported by Ivanka Trump.

Republican Bill Summary:

Republican lawmakers have introduced the Strong Families Act. That bill would give employers offering at least two weeks of paid family or medical leave a 25 percent tax credit for wages paid to workers taking up to 12 weeks of leave. The credit would be capped at $3,000 per employee per year. The credit would cease entirely two years after enactment.

Democrat Bill Summary:

Congressional Democrats, meanwhile, have reintroduced the Family and Medical Insurance Leave, or FAMILY Act, which they first submitted in 2013. It would permit all workers to take up to 60 individual days of paid leave per year to care for a new child, a sick family member or one's own illness. Workers would receive up to 66 percent of their regular wages to a maximum $1,000 per week. The program, initially introduced in 2013, would be funded by a 0.4 percent payroll tax on workers' wages, split evenly between employers and employees.

If you have any questions at all, do not hesitate to contact the Washington Representative for FEW Tonya Saunders at 202-670-2298 or tsaunders@washingtonpremiergroup.net.

State Law Summary:

  • Washington State passed a bipartisan Paid Family and Medical Leave Program in 2017.
  • New York State passed a bipartisan Paid Family and Medical Leave Program in 2016.
  • Rhode Island implemented Paid Family and Medical Leave Program in 2014.
  • New Jersey implemented Paid Family and Medical Leave Program in 2009.
  • California implemented Paid Family and Medical Leave Program in 2004, and updated the law in 2017.
  • Active Campaigns in Bipartisan States (Meaning Governors with at least one branch of the legislature in the opposite party’s control)
    • Massachusetts
    • Colorado
    • Vermont
    • New Hampshire

Letter to Senate

As your constituent and a member of Federally Employed Women (FEW), I urge you to co-sponsor S. 337 The Family Act, that was introduced by Senator Kirsten Gilibrand, (D-NY) that would promise up to 12 weeks of paid time off for any worker -- female or male -- who has a new child, including newly fostered or adopted children. It also applies to people who have a "serious" medical condition or a family member suffering with one.

The U. S. economy loses $21 billion a year because of minimal access to paid family leave. The American public wants Congress to address their concerns about financial stability, and update our programs to meet the needs of a 21st century society.

Nearly every American, at some point in their lives, will need to take time away from work to recover from an illness, nurse a sick loved one, or care for a new child. However, despite the inevitable need for occasional time off from work, only 86 percent of workers have access to paid family leave, and over half of the American workforce does not have access to employer-provided personal leave.

As a result, families suffer personally and economically from having to choose between a paycheck and their loved ones. When they leave the labor force early due to caregiving responsibilities, men lose $284,000 in lifetime wages and Social Security benefits, and women lose $324,000.

Please cosponsor the Family Act and urge passage so employees do not have to choose between families and paychecks and our economy does not have to suffer.

If you need more information about this issue, please contact the FEW Washington Representative Tonya Saunders at 202-421-5100, or via email at tsaunders@few.org.

Letter to House

As your constituent and a member of Federally Employed Women (FEW), I urge you to co-sponsor H.R. 947 The Family Act, that was introduced by Representative Rosa DeLauro, (D-CT) that would promise up to 12 weeks of paid time off for any worker -- female or male -- who has a new child, including newly fostered or adopted children. It also applies to people who have a "serious" medical condition or a family member suffering with one.

The U.S. economy loses $21 billion a year because of minimal access to paid family leave. The American public wants Congress to address their concerns about financial stability, and update our programs to meet the needs of a 21st century society.

Nearly every American, at some point in their lives, will need to take time away from work to recover from an illness, nurse a sick loved one, or care for a new child. However, despite the inevitable need for occasional time off from work, only 86 percent of workers have access to paid family leave, and over half of the American workforce does not have access to employer-provided personal leave.

As a result, families suffer personally and economically from having to choose between a paycheck and their loved ones. When they leave the labor force early due to caregiving responsibilities, men lose $284,000 in lifetime wages and Social Security benefits, and women lose $324,000.

Please cosponsor the Family Act and urge passage, so employees do not have to choose between families and paychecks and our economy does not have to suffer.

If you need more information about this issue, please contact the FEW Washington Representative Tonya Saunders at 202-421-5100, or via email at tsaunders@few.org.

Dr. Madeline Lewis
congressionalrelationsvp@few.org
Vice President for Congressional Relations
Federally Employed Women


ACTION ALERT – Paid Medical Leave

Federally Employed Women (FEW) is asking our many members to contact their legislators and urge them to co-sponsor and support the bill The Family Act, sponsored by Senator Kirsten Gilibrand (D-NY), which creates a self-sustaining family insurance program for all workers – young and elderly, single and married, and women and men, regardless of the size of their employer. Modeled after successful state programs, and costing only as much as a cup of coffee per week, the fund would provide up to 66 percent wage-replacement for 12 weeks in the event of a serious personal or family medical emergency.

PAID FAMILY LEAVE PROVIDES ECONOMIC SECURITY FOR WORKING AMERICAN FAMILIES

FEW Supports S. 337 The Family Act, as introduced by
Senator Kirsten Gilibrand (D-NY)
And H.R. 947 The Family Act, as introduced by
Representative Rosa DeLauro (D-CT)

The U. S. economy loses $21 billion a year because of
minimal access to paid family leave

The American public overwhelmingly supports policies that guarantee workers paid leave if they have a child, get sick or need to care for a family member. Yet the United States is the only developed nation that lacks a paid family leave mandate.

Senator Kirsten Gillibrand is hoping to change that. Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand York is calling on the Trump administration to support a nation-wide, gender-neutral paid family leave program. She stated that Ivanka Trump's plan has not made it into policy from the White House and does not go far enough. Gillibrand, a Democrat from New York who has served since 2009, has introduced a universal paid family leave law bill every year for the last five years. Her bill promises up to 12 weeks of paid time off for any worker -- female or male -- who has a new child, including newly fostered or adopted children. It also applies to people who have a "serious" medical condition or a family member suffering with one.

Summary:

Here's how Senator Gillibrand's plan would work: While the workers are off the job, they would be guaranteed at least 66% of their regular earnings or up to $4,000 per month. The measure would cover everyone with a job -- from part-time fast food workers to cashiers at mom-and-pop shops. Senator Gillibrand proposes paying for the plan through tax contributions from employers and workers. Both would be required to pay what equals to two cents per $10 earned. That tax money would go into a government-managed fund. Then, when a worker is on family leave, he or she will draw paychecks from it. About 14 percent of American workers currently have access to paid family leave of any kind, according to the National Compensation Survey.

Administration Summary:

In its 2018 budget, the Trump administration included a national paid-leave plan for parents after the birth or adoption of a child. Proposed are six weeks of paid leave for mothers and fathers at an estimated annual cost of $25 billion, funded by restructuring the federal unemployment insurance system. This position is documented and supported by Ivanka Trump.

Republican Bill Summary:

Republican lawmakers have introduced the Strong Families Act. That bill would give employers offering at least two weeks of paid family or medical leave a 25 percent tax credit for wages paid to workers taking up to 12 weeks of leave. The credit would be capped at $3,000 per employee per year. The credit would cease entirely two years after enactment.

Democrat Bill Summary:

Congressional Democrats, meanwhile, have reintroduced the Family and Medical Insurance Leave, or FAMILY Act, which they first submitted in 2013. It would permit all workers to take up to 60 individual days of paid leave per year to care for a new child, a sick family member or one's own illness. Workers would receive up to 66 percent of their regular wages to a maximum $1,000 per week. The program, initially introduced in 2013, would be funded by a 0.4 percent payroll tax on workers' wages, split evenly between employers and employees.

If you have any questions at all, do not hesitate to contact the Washington Representative for FEW Tonya Saunders at 202-670-2298 or tsaunders@washingtonpremiergroup.net.

State Law Summary:

  • Washington State passed a bipartisan Paid Family and Medical Leave Program in 2017.
  • New York State passed a bipartisan Paid Family and Medical Leave Program in 2016.
  • Rhode Island implemented Paid Family and Medical Leave Program in 2014.
  • New Jersey implemented Paid Family and Medical Leave Program in 2009.
  • California implemented Paid Family and Medical Leave Program in 2004, and updated the law in 2017.
  • Active Campaigns in Bipartisan States (Meaning Governors with at least one branch of the legislature in the opposite party’s control)
    • Massachusetts
    • Colorado
    • Vermont
    • New Hampshire

Letter to Senate

As your constituent and a member of Federally Employed Women (FEW), I urge you to co-sponsor S. 337 The Family Act, that was introduced by Senator Kirsten Gilibrand, (D-NY) that would promise up to 12 weeks of paid time off for any worker -- female or male -- who has a new child, including newly fostered or adopted children. It also applies to people who have a "serious" medical condition or a family member suffering with one.

The U. S. economy loses $21 billion a year because of minimal access to paid family leave. The American public wants Congress to address their concerns about financial stability, and update our programs to meet the needs of a 21st century society.

Nearly every American, at some point in their lives, will need to take time away from work to recover from an illness, nurse a sick loved one, or care for a new child. However, despite the inevitable need for occasional time off from work, only 86 percent of workers have access to paid family leave, and over half of the American workforce does not have access to employer-provided personal leave.

As a result, families suffer personally and economically from having to choose between a paycheck and their loved ones. When they leave the labor force early due to caregiving responsibilities, men lose $284,000 in lifetime wages and Social Security benefits, and women lose $324,000.

Please cosponsor the Family Act and urge passage so employees do not have to choose between families and paychecks and our economy does not have to suffer.

If you need more information about this issue, please contact the FEW Washington Representative Tonya Saunders at 202-421-5100, or via email at tsaunders@few.org.

Letter to House

As your constituent and a member of Federally Employed Women (FEW), I urge you to co-sponsor H.R. 947 The Family Act, that was introduced by Representative Rosa DeLauro, (D-CT) that would promise up to 12 weeks of paid time off for any worker -- female or male -- who has a new child, including newly fostered or adopted children. It also applies to people who have a "serious" medical condition or a family member suffering with one.

The U.S. economy loses $21 billion a year because of minimal access to paid family leave. The American public wants Congress to address their concerns about financial stability, and update our programs to meet the needs of a 21st century society.

Nearly every American, at some point in their lives, will need to take time away from work to recover from an illness, nurse a sick loved one, or care for a new child. However, despite the inevitable need for occasional time off from work, only 86 percent of workers have access to paid family leave, and over half of the American workforce does not have access to employer-provided personal leave.

As a result, families suffer personally and economically from having to choose between a paycheck and their loved ones. When they leave the labor force early due to caregiving responsibilities, men lose $284,000 in lifetime wages and Social Security benefits, and women lose $324,000.

Please cosponsor the Family Act and urge passage, so employees do not have to choose between families and paychecks and our economy does not have to suffer.

If you need more information about this issue, please contact the FEW Washington Representative Tonya Saunders at 202-421-5100, or via email at tsaunders@few.org.

Dr. Madeline Lewis
congressionalrelationsvp@few.org
Vice President for Congressional Relations
Federally Employed Women

Federally Employed Women (FEW) is asking our many members to contact their legislators and urge them to co-sponsor and support the bill The Family Act, sponsored by Senator Kirsten Gilibrand (D-NY), which creates a self-sustaining family insurance program for all workers – young and elderly, single and married, and women and men, regardless of the size of their employer. Modeled after successful state programs, and costing only as much as a cup of coffee per week, the fund would provide up to 66 percent wage-replacement for 12 weeks in the event of a serious personal or family medical emergency.

ACTION ALERT – Paid Medical Leave

Federally Employed Women (FEW) is asking our many members to contact their legislators and urge them to co-sponsor and support the bill The Family Act, sponsored by Senator Kirsten Gilibrand (D-NY), which creates a self-sustaining family insurance program for all workers – young and elderly, single and married, and women and men, regardless of the size of their employer. Modeled after successful state programs, and costing only as much as a cup of coffee per week, the fund would provide up to 66 percent wage-replacement for 12 weeks in the event of a serious personal or family medical emergency.

PAID FAMILY LEAVE PROVIDES ECONOMIC SECURITY FOR WORKING AMERICAN FAMILIES

FEW Supports S. 337 The Family Act, as introduced by
Senator Kirsten Gilibrand (D-NY)
And H.R. 947 The Family Act, as introduced by
Representative Rosa DeLauro (D-CT)

The U. S. economy loses $21 billion a year because of
minimal access to paid family leave

The American public overwhelmingly supports policies that guarantee workers paid leave if they have a child, get sick or need to care for a family member. Yet the United States is the only developed nation that lacks a paid family leave mandate.

Senator Kirsten Gillibrand is hoping to change that. Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand York is calling on the Trump administration to support a nation-wide, gender-neutral paid family leave program. She stated that Ivanka Trump's plan has not made it into policy from the White House and does not go far enough. Gillibrand, a Democrat from New York who has served since 2009, has introduced a universal paid family leave law bill every year for the last five years. Her bill promises up to 12 weeks of paid time off for any worker -- female or male -- who has a new child, including newly fostered or adopted children. It also applies to people who have a "serious" medical condition or a family member suffering with one.

Summary:

Here's how Senator Gillibrand's plan would work: While the workers are off the job, they would be guaranteed at least 66% of their regular earnings or up to $4,000 per month. The measure would cover everyone with a job -- from part-time fast food workers to cashiers at mom-and-pop shops. Senator Gillibrand proposes paying for the plan through tax contributions from employers and workers. Both would be required to pay what equals to two cents per $10 earned. That tax money would go into a government-managed fund. Then, when a worker is on family leave, he or she will draw paychecks from it. About 14 percent of American workers currently have access to paid family leave of any kind, according to the National Compensation Survey.

Administration Summary:

In its 2018 budget, the Trump administration included a national paid-leave plan for parents after the birth or adoption of a child. Proposed are six weeks of paid leave for mothers and fathers at an estimated annual cost of $25 billion, funded by restructuring the federal unemployment insurance system. This position is documented and supported by Ivanka Trump.

Republican Bill Summary:

Republican lawmakers have introduced the Strong Families Act. That bill would give employers offering at least two weeks of paid family or medical leave a 25 percent tax credit for wages paid to workers taking up to 12 weeks of leave. The credit would be capped at $3,000 per employee per year. The credit would cease entirely two years after enactment.

Democrat Bill Summary:

Congressional Democrats, meanwhile, have reintroduced the Family and Medical Insurance Leave, or FAMILY Act, which they first submitted in 2013. It would permit all workers to take up to 60 individual days of paid leave per year to care for a new child, a sick family member or one's own illness. Workers would receive up to 66 percent of their regular wages to a maximum $1,000 per week. The program, initially introduced in 2013, would be funded by a 0.4 percent payroll tax on workers' wages, split evenly between employers and employees.

If you have any questions at all, do not hesitate to contact the Washington Representative for FEW Tonya Saunders at 202-670-2298 or tsaunders@washingtonpremiergroup.net.

State Law Summary:

  • Washington State passed a bipartisan Paid Family and Medical Leave Program in 2017.
  • New York State passed a bipartisan Paid Family and Medical Leave Program in 2016.
  • Rhode Island implemented Paid Family and Medical Leave Program in 2014.
  • New Jersey implemented Paid Family and Medical Leave Program in 2009.
  • California implemented Paid Family and Medical Leave Program in 2004, and updated the law in 2017.
  • Active Campaigns in Bipartisan States (Meaning Governors with at least one branch of the legislature in the opposite party’s control)
    • Massachusetts
    • Colorado
    • Vermont
    • New Hampshire

Letter to Senate

As your constituent and a member of Federally Employed Women (FEW), I urge you to co-sponsor S. 337 The Family Act, that was introduced by Senator Kirsten Gilibrand, (D-NY) that would promise up to 12 weeks of paid time off for any worker -- female or male -- who has a new child, including newly fostered or adopted children. It also applies to people who have a "serious" medical condition or a family member suffering with one.

The U. S. economy loses $21 billion a year because of minimal access to paid family leave. The American public wants Congress to address their concerns about financial stability, and update our programs to meet the needs of a 21st century society.

Nearly every American, at some point in their lives, will need to take time away from work to recover from an illness, nurse a sick loved one, or care for a new child. However, despite the inevitable need for occasional time off from work, only 86 percent of workers have access to paid family leave, and over half of the American workforce does not have access to employer-provided personal leave.

As a result, families suffer personally and economically from having to choose between a paycheck and their loved ones. When they leave the labor force early due to caregiving responsibilities, men lose $284,000 in lifetime wages and Social Security benefits, and women lose $324,000.

Please cosponsor the Family Act and urge passage so employees do not have to choose between families and paychecks and our economy does not have to suffer.

If you need more information about this issue, please contact the FEW Washington Representative Tonya Saunders at 202-421-5100, or via email at tsaunders@few.org.

Letter to House

As your constituent and a member of Federally Employed Women (FEW), I urge you to co-sponsor H.R. 947 The Family Act, that was introduced by Representative Rosa DeLauro, (D-CT) that would promise up to 12 weeks of paid time off for any worker -- female or male -- who has a new child, including newly fostered or adopted children. It also applies to people who have a "serious" medical condition or a family member suffering with one.

The U.S. economy loses $21 billion a year because of minimal access to paid family leave. The American public wants Congress to address their concerns about financial stability, and update our programs to meet the needs of a 21st century society.

Nearly every American, at some point in their lives, will need to take time away from work to recover from an illness, nurse a sick loved one, or care for a new child. However, despite the inevitable need for occasional time off from work, only 86 percent of workers have access to paid family leave, and over half of the American workforce does not have access to employer-provided personal leave.

As a result, families suffer personally and economically from having to choose between a paycheck and their loved ones. When they leave the labor force early due to caregiving responsibilities, men lose $284,000 in lifetime wages and Social Security benefits, and women lose $324,000.

Please cosponsor the Family Act and urge passage, so employees do not have to choose between families and paychecks and our economy does not have to suffer.

If you need more information about this issue, please contact the FEW Washington Representative Tonya Saunders at 202-421-5100, or via email at tsaunders@few.org.

Dr. Madeline Lewis
congressionalrelationsvp@few.org
Vice President for Congressional Relations
Federally Employed Women

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