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LVCS 0031: PATTI WILSON ON GETTING THINGS DONE, DECOMPRESSING + GETTING OFF THE PATH TO NOWHERE POSITIVE AS AN AIR TRAFFIC CONTROLLER 

December 13, 2017 One of the ways I support women is through this podcast. My job as host is to introduce you to women who are making an impact in the world without letting burnout slow them down. This episode’s guest is no exception. Back in April, the idea for this podcast came to me while I was plunked at the airport. I was wondering about what some of the most stressful jobs for women were. Bam! I immediately thought of air traffic controllers. Trying to track down a female professional controller was no easy feat. (Turns out, women are less than 20% of that workforce.) After several months of research, connecting, planning, and FAA approval - I am so excited to introduce you to this week’s guest, Patti Wilson! 

Patti Wilson has been in the air traffic control industry for the past 29 years. She’s the Operations Manager at Northern California Terminal Radar Approach Control, and is currently in her second term as President of Professional Women Controllers. If that wasn’t enough, she’s also very involved in nonprofit work with Zonta International. She’s also a pistol deeply committed to pulling up a seat for more women at the aviation table. 

Patti brings both a breadth and depth of experience and wisdom to our conversation. She paints a picture of what being an air traffic controller is like (the good, the stressful and the invisible to us non-controller folks). She also talks about the difference between communication at work versus everyday conversations (like the risk of talking to people in bullet points and commands outside of work). We also cover staying humble, handling stress, and giving/receiving feedback. You’re now cleared for listening takeoff. So, go ahead and switch to listening to this podcast on your favorite smartphone or listening device. Listen to the complete episode in any of these fine places:  

LVCS 0052: JESSICA GROUNDS ON CREATING WOMEN LEADERS + THE GENDER DIVERSITY RUBBER MEETING THE WORKPLACE ROAD 

October 24, 2018 Are you someone who's ever looked at leadership in your government, workplace, or organization and thought, “Well, hot damn, I don't see a lot of women in the ranks of leadership up in here.” If this is you or now I’ve got you thinking about this, then I have a guest for you this week. Meet Jessica Grounds. 

Jessica Grounds has been busting her rump in Washington D.C. since the age of 22. She has founded and led multiple organizations across both the public and private sectors to advance women in leadership. Today, we're going to learn all about the strategic gender-inclusive, bipartisan work she's doing with Mine The Gap, an organization on a mission to create gender-inclusive environment for companies, organizations, and businesses. You’ll also hear Jessica pull wisdom from her own experiences as the founder and former Executive Director of Running Start. She helps us more fully understand the barriers facing women in the workplace today and beyond. 

Additionally, we touch on the topics of sexism, gender diversity in the workplace, and balancing work and life as a new mother. Plus, Jessica offers practical and realistic steps we can all take within our own organizations to encourage leadership among women - starting right now. 

The midterm elections are coming up here in the United States, so I felt like this was such an important conversation to have right now. The work Jessica is doing is so timely, but also so important beyond the midterm elections. I hope you agree. Now, get listening! For all of my American listeners, get out and vote on November 6th. Sign up for reminders and polling from Vote.org. Prepare yourself with ballot information at BallotReady.  

LVCS 0053: KATE NNANNA-IBEMGBO ON NAVIGATING ULTIMATUMS IN THE WORKPLACE, RECOGNIZING THE DEPTH OF A MOTHER'S LOVE + LEAVING FOOTPRINTS IN THE SANDS OF TIME 

November 14, 2018 Each episode, I introduce you to women who are really walking their talk, so we can add some of their swagger to our step. We have so much to learn from this week’s guest, Kate Nnanna-Ibemgbo. Kate worked her way up to Chief Air Traffic Control Officer with the Nigerian Airspace Management Agency (NAMA) at the Murtala Mohammed International Airport in Ikeja- Lagos over 11 years before joining the Nigerian Civil Aviation Authority (NCAA) as an Air Safety Inspector in April 2018. She is also a caring wife, a nurturing mom of three adorable boys, and is a speaking/writing/inspirational force for good in our global community. 

Buckle up, folks! We cover a lot of ground, or in this case, shall we say airspace? We talk about owning your personal space and exhibiting grace under duress, navigating ultimatums in a “man’s workplace”, and the importance of making and taking quiet time. Plus, we explore the depth of a mother’s love, talk about acceptance, and Kate shares poignantly how she is consciously leaving her footprints in the sands of time. So. Much. Awesome. All packed into one episode. 

Help support the podcast: If anything in this episode resonated with you or moved you, please share it with 1 person you think needs a little spark. By sharing it, you make a difference for them and support the creation of future podcasts. If you want more tips and information about slaying bullshit and sidestepping burnout, plus links to new podcast episodes, please sign up for my monthly newsletter. As always, thank you for listening + sharing this podcast. If I could personally hug each listener, I would! 

There are times I meet people in this world when I can literally feel the sphere of energy around them. Kate is one of these people. She's tirelessly inspiring, working to connect her Air Traffic Controlling sisters, young girls, and pretty much any woman who crosses her path. We are like-minded sisters, who also deeply believes that we have so much more in common and how interconnected we all truly are. Dive into this episode by clicking the links below.